COVID-19 Community Level & Assessing Your Risk

Click here to view the full COVID-19 Community Levels by County Map.

Knowing the status of COVID-19 in Jackson County and your personal risk level can help you make informed decisions on how to best protect yourself.

COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations are down in many parts of the United States following the recent Omicron surge – including here in Jackson County. 

To help individuals understand their risk and the degree of precautions they should take moving forward, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated its guidance and created a new tool.

The COVID-19 Community Level metric system uses three pieces of local data – case counts, hospital admissions and hospital capacity – to determine the impact of COVID-19 within a county. Based on these factors, community level is then classified as being low, medium or high.

New recommendations from the CDC indicate precautions community members (especially those at-risk for severe disease) should take during each community level. Read on to view recommendations for both the general public and those at higher risk.

Jackson County’s Current Community Level

LOW

Recommendations

  • Stay up to date with COVID-19 vaccines and boosters
  • Maintain improved ventilation throughout indoor spaces when possible
  • Follow CDC recommendations for isolation and quarantine
  • Immunocompromised and high-risk individuals should have a plan for rapid testing, if needed, and talk to their healthcare provider about whether they’re a candidate for treatments. 

Updated weekly. Last updated 5/19/2022.

Recommended Prevention Strategies by Community Level

When the community level is low or medium, many residents can consider relaxing precautions and going without masks in public indoor settings. In high levels, however, the CDC recommends masking in all public indoor spaces regardless of vaccination status

Individuals at high risk (or who have a household or social contact at high risk for severe disease) should consider taking additional measures.

LOW Community Level

 

If you are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe disease, consider these extra steps when the community level is Low:

  • Have a plan for rapid testing if needed (e.g. having home tests or access to testing)
  • Talk to your healthcare provider about whether you’re a candidate for treatments like oral antivirals, PrEP, and monoclonal antibodies

MEDIUM Community Level

 

If you are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe disease, consider these extra steps when the community level is Medium:

  • Wear a well-fitting mask indoors in public, regardless of vaccination status (including in K-12 schools and other indoor community settings)
  • If you have questions about additional precautions you should take based on your health status, consult with your doctor
  • Have a plan for rapid testing, if needed (e.g. having home tests or access to testing)
  • Talk to your healthcare provider about whether you’re a candidate for treatments like oral antivirals, PrEP, and monoclonal antibodies

HIGH Community Level

  • Wear a well-fitting mask indoors in public, regardless of vaccination status (including in K-12 schools and other indoor community settings)
  • Stay up-to-date with COVID-19 vaccines and boosters
  • Improve ventilation in indoor spaces, when possible (open doors & windows)
  • Get tested if you have symptoms
  • Follow isolation & quarantine guidance
  • If you have a household or social contact who’s at high risk for severe disease:
    • Consider self-testing to detect infection before contact
    • Consider wearing a mask when indoors with them

 

If you are immunocompromised or at high risk for severe disease, consider these extra steps when the community level is High:

    • Wear a mask or respirator that provides you with greater protection
    • Consider avoiding non-essential indoor activities in public where you could be exposed
    • Talk to your healthcare provider about whether you need to wear a mask and take other precautions
    • Have a plan for rapid testing, if needed (e.g. having home tests or access to testing)
    • Talk to your healthcare provider about whether you’re a candidate for treatments like oral antivirals, PrEP, and monoclonal antibodies

For more on recommended prevention measures during each community level, visit the CDC’s website.

Everyone ages 5+ can get a booster, and now those 50+ or immunocompromised (12+) can get a second.Learn More
+